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Law Degrees & Specialties

LAW DEGREES

Law school graduates typically earn a Juris Doctor (J.D.) degree.  If you want to practice law in the United States, you usually need a J.D. degree.

Some students earn a J.D. to become a practicing attorney.  Others may earn a J.D. to become a law librarian, legal researcher, sports agent, technical editor, professor, consultant, corporate compliance program director, etc.

 

JOINT LAW DEGREES

Some law schools may offer a joint (also called "concurrent" or "dual") graduate degree in another area for law students who have multiple interests.

A joint degree allows the law student to complete the J.D. and the other graduate degree simultaneously.

Some joint degrees may require an extra year in addition to the three-year law degree.  Other joint degrees may be structured to be completed during the regular three years of law school.

 

Examples of joint law degrees (but joint degrees exist at many other law schools):

UCLA School of Law

University of Washington School of Law

University of Texas at Austin School of Law

Stanford University Law School

University of Oregon School of Law

 

SPECIALTIES IN LAW SCHOOL

Some law schools allow an emphasis or specialty within their law program to prepare for a career in a specific area of law.

 

Examples of specialties (but specialties exist at many other law schools):

Harvard University Law School

Seton Hall University Law School

Stanford University Law School

UC Davis School of Law

UCLA School of Law

University of Arizona James E. Rogers College of Law

University of Minnesota Law School

University of Oregon School of Law

 

STUDY ABROAD DURING LAW SCHOOL

Students in some law schools may be able to study abroad for a semester during law school.

 

Examples of law school study abroad (but study abroad may exist at many other law schools):